The Things You Need to Know About Subrogation

Subrogation is an idea that's understood among insurance and legal professionals but often not by the policyholders they represent. Even if you've never heard the word before, it is in your self-interest to understand the steps of how it works. The more information you have about it, the more likely it is that relevant proceedings will work out in your favor.

Every insurance policy you hold is an assurance that, if something bad happens to you, the business on the other end of the policy will make good in one way or another without unreasonable delay. If you get hurt while working, your employer's workers compensation pays out for medical services. Employment lawyers handle the details; you just get fixed up.

But since ascertaining who is financially accountable for services or repairs is typically a heavily involved affair – and time spent waiting sometimes increases the damage to the policyholder – insurance companies in many cases opt to pay up front and assign blame after the fact. They then need a mechanism to get back the costs if, in the end, they weren't responsible for the expense.

Can You Give an Example?

Your stove catches fire and causes $10,000 in home damages. Luckily, you have property insurance and it takes care of the repair expenses. However, the insurance investigator discovers that an electrician had installed some faulty wiring, and there is a reasonable possibility that a judge would find him to blame for the loss. You already have your money, but your insurance agency is out $10,000. What does the agency do next?

How Subrogation Works

This is where subrogation comes in. It is the process that an insurance company uses to claim reimbursement after it has paid for something that should have been paid by some other entity. Some companies have in-house property damage lawyers and personal injury attorneys, or a department dedicated to subrogation; others contract with a law firm. Usually, only you can sue for damages to your person or property. But under subrogation law, your insurance company is extended some of your rights for having taken care of the damages. It can go after the money originally due to you, because it has covered the amount already.

Why Should I Care?

For a start, if your insurance policy stipulated a deductible, it wasn't just your insurance company that had to pay. In a $10,000 accident with a $1,000 deductible, you lost some money too – to the tune of $1,000. If your insurance company is unconcerned with pursuing subrogation even when it is entitled, it might choose to recoup its expenses by ballooning your premiums and call it a day. On the other hand, if it knows which cases it is owed and pursues them enthusiastically, it is doing you a favor as well as itself. If all of the money is recovered, you will get your full $1,000 deductible back. If it recovers half (for instance, in a case where you are found one-half culpable), you'll typically get $500 back, depending on the laws in your state.

Furthermore, if the total cost of an accident is more than your maximum coverage amount, you may have had to pay the difference. If your insurance company or its property damage lawyers, such as auto accident attorney SMYRNA, Ga, successfully press a subrogation case, it will recover your costs in addition to its own.

All insurers are not the same. When comparing, it's worth weighing the records of competing firms to evaluate whether they pursue legitimate subrogation claims; if they resolve those claims without delay; if they keep their policyholders posted as the case proceeds; and if they then process successfully won reimbursements right away so that you can get your losses back and move on with your life. If, instead, an insurance agency has a record of honoring claims that aren't its responsibility and then protecting its profitability by raising your premiums, you should keep looking.

Your Rights and Responsibilities with Police

Even if police provide you with assistance and are respectful, having to meet with them is rarely a positive experience. Whether your situation involves violence, DUI, minor offenses or other criminal matters or white collar, sex offense, violent or drug crimes, it's important to be aware of your responsibilities and duties. If you could be guilty of wrongdoing or could be charged with a felony or misdemeanor, contact an attorney right away.

You May Not Need to Show ID

Many people are not aware that they aren't obligated to answer all a police officer's questions, even if they are behind the wheel. Even if you must show identification, you generally don't have to answer other questions officers might have about anything such as your recent whereabouts and activities or what you've been drinking, in the case of a potential DUI arrest. These protections were put into the U.S. Constitution and have been verified by the U.S. Supreme Court. While it's usually best to work nicely with officers, it's important to understand that you have a right to not incriminate yourself.

Imagine a situation where officers suspect you may have run afoul of the law, but you aren't guilty. This is just one time where you should to be advised by a top-tier lawyer. Knowing all the laws and being familiar with the multiple situations in which they are applicable should be left up to qualified attorneys. This is notably true since laws occasionally change and matters of law are decided often that also make a difference.

Usually, Talking is OK

While there are times to stay mute in the working with the police, remember how most officers really want to keep the peace and would rather not make arrests. Refusing to cooperate could cause problems and make your community less safe. This is another instance when you should hire the best criminal defense attorney, such as marijuana defense attorney Bridgeport, TX is wise. Your attorney can tell you when you should speak up with information and when to shut your mouth.

Question Permission to Search

You don't have to give permission to look through your home or vehicle. However, if you begin to talk, leave evidence lying around, or grant permission for a search, any data found could be used against you in future criminal defense proceedings. It's probably good to say no to searches verbally and let your attorney handle it.